Resources

Welcome to our Searchable Resources Directory! We've pulled together the best stewardship, conservation, and environmental resources for you to use and share.

Looking for a specific resource that you can't find? Or do you have a resource you think we should include? Send an email to staff@stewardshipnetwork.org and let us know!

Michigan Amphibian & Reptile Best Management Practices

This manual was created for the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) by Herpetological Resources and Management (HRM) to provide a comprehensive guide to Best Management Practices (BMPs) to improve and maintain the viability of Michigan amphibian and reptile populations. This manual addresses threats to Michigan’s amphibian and reptile (i.e., herpetofauna) communities posed by development and conservation management practices. The manual contains alternatives that are based on the best available science to facilitate conservation actions to protect specific species and the communities that support them. These BMPs are designed to inform land management and, development, and conservation activities, including restoration. This BMP manual is a Michigan-focused guide that provides specific recommendations to regulators, agency land managers, consultants, commercial and residential developers, and private citizens to protect, preserve, and restore the herpetofauna of Michigan.

Mistaken Identity?

Mistaken Identities? Invasive Plants and their Native Look-Alikes an Identification Guide for the Mid-Atlantic

Keynote: Farming Our Way to Resilience: Restoration Agriculture

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference Keynote presentation by Mark Shepard from Forest Agricultural Enterprises

Sediment transport mechanisms in agricultural watersheds

This study was conducted to improve understanding and prediction of sediment delivery through agricultural watersheds, with emphasis on the pathways from edge-of-field to receiving waters. The study was focused on agricultural watersheds within the University of Wisconsin (UW) - Platteville Pioneer Farm and one of the UW Discovery Farms located in southwestern Wisconsin. Artificial neural network (ANN) models were developed to predict runoff and sediment yield from agricultural watersheds that employ best management practices (BMPs). Results showed that input parameters representing BMPs were important for accurately simulating runoff and sediment yield from these watersheds. The study also showed that ANN models were able to successfully simulate runoff and sediment yield during training, validation and testing phases. Sediment eroded from upland source areas is often carried to the watershed outlet via grassed waterways. Critical shear stress of the soil is often estimated to determine the potential for soil to be detached. Previous studies suggest that critical shear stress may vary with antecedent moisture content. The dynamic nature of critical shear stress in an upland agricultural field and grassed waterway of a nested watershed was investigated at Pioneer Farm by measuring critical shear stress over a range of antecedent soil moisture conditions. Results showed that critical shear stress in both the grassed waterway and the agricultural field increased as soil moisture increased until the soil moisture content reached the plastic limit. Above the plastic limit, critical shear stress of the soil decreased significantly and was relatively constant, ultimately rendering the soil more susceptible to erosion. Finally, the process-based Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model was used to develop regressions equations that use channel, watershed and storm characteristics to estimate sediment delivery ratios (SDRs) for grassed waterways draining upland agricultural fields. Upland agricultural management scenarios considered included: (i) corn-oat-alfalfa crop rotation, chisel plow tillage, and terraces, and (ii) corn-oat-alfalfa crop rotation, chisel plow tillage, and no-terraces. Better R2 values resulted from equations developed for non-terraced fields compared to terraced fields suggested that channel and storm parameters were better able to explain the variation in SDR for grassed waterways draining from non-terraced fields.

Prairie Moon Cultural Guide

This is an excellent - arguably the best - species-specific guide to seed germination, soil moisture requirements, sun exposure, and much more. If you propagate native plants by seed, this is will become one of your go-to references for propagating over 800 native forbs, grasses, sedges, rushes, trees, shrubs, vines, ferns, and cacti.

Gadgets and Apps for the Field

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Alicia Ihnken from Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Parks and Recreation Division

A Technical Guide for Monitoring Wildlife Habitat

The tragedy of the commons occurs when people pursue their self-interests in using a shared resource and deplete it, thereby compromising their long-term welfare (Hardin 1968). The larger the area shared, the greater the potential for tragedy. The USDA Forest Service is a multiple-use Federal agency that seeks to balance multiple uses of public resources across the Nation while protecting those resources. The agency, facing continual pressure from the public and interest groups to use public resources, has developed a planning process that includes within its framework an important step—monitoring. Monitoring the effects of resource policies and projects on the Nation’s resources is critical to maintaining the long-term health, diversity, and productivity of the public’s forests and grasslands today and into the future. A well-designed monitoring program avoids the tragedy of the commons. This guide is an invaluable contribution to understanding how to monitor habitats.

Michigan's Natural Communities

This natural community classification is designed to serve as a tool for those seeking to understand, describe, and document the diversity of natural communities in Michigan.

Sorting through the seed bank: Ecology and applications to restoration

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference Presentation by Dr. Lars Brudvig of Michigan State University and Mitch Lettow of the Southwest Michigan Land Conservancy.

A New Approach to Monitoring Conservation Easements from a Fixed Wing Aircraft

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Charles Dawley from Little Traverse Conservancy

How Your Garden Interacts with Nature

Most of us garden because we like to grow our own healthy food and love to have nature around us. Yet our gardens can affect the natural areas surrounding our homes in some unexpected ways. Take this quiz below, and come up with your own answers. Then check out our answers at the end!

Beyond the Usual Suspects in Invasive Species Control: Detection and Control of Oak Wilt

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Heidi Marie Frei from Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Online Invasive Species Training Modules

The invasive species education modules will help you become more comfortable with identifying these species in the field. Each module includes a short ten question quiz at the end to help you assess your newly acquired knowledge. Completing a module should only take about 15 minutes.

Guidelines for Hosting a Seed Collection Workday

This is a simple handout to guide land owners and managers through hosting a successful native seed collection workday.

Invasive Species Placemats

These printable place-mats can be a useful educational tool for preventing the spread of invasive species.

Natural Shorelines for Inland Lakes

A Landowner’s Guide to using natural materials to stabilize shorelines, improve water quality and enhance wildlife habitat along Michigan’s inland lakeshore.

Wildland Fire Chain Saws Student Workbook

The following training material attains the standards prescribed for courses developed under the inter-agency curriculum established and coordinated by the National Wildfire Coordinating Group.

Feral Swine in Michigan

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Tim Wilson from USDA Wildlife Services

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