Resources

Welcome to our Searchable Resources Directory! We've pulled together the best stewardship, conservation, and environmental resources for you to use and share.

Looking for a specific resource that you can't find? Or do you have a resource you think we should include? Send an email to staff@stewardshipnetwork.org and let us know!

Mistaken Identity?

Mistaken Identities? Invasive Plants and their Native Look-Alikes an Identification Guide for the Mid-Atlantic

Sediment transport mechanisms in agricultural watersheds

This study was conducted to improve understanding and prediction of sediment delivery through agricultural watersheds, with emphasis on the pathways from edge-of-field to receiving waters. The study was focused on agricultural watersheds within the University of Wisconsin (UW) - Platteville Pioneer Farm and one of the UW Discovery Farms located in southwestern Wisconsin. Artificial neural network (ANN) models were developed to predict runoff and sediment yield from agricultural watersheds that employ best management practices (BMPs). Results showed that input parameters representing BMPs were important for accurately simulating runoff and sediment yield from these watersheds. The study also showed that ANN models were able to successfully simulate runoff and sediment yield during training, validation and testing phases. Sediment eroded from upland source areas is often carried to the watershed outlet via grassed waterways. Critical shear stress of the soil is often estimated to determine the potential for soil to be detached. Previous studies suggest that critical shear stress may vary with antecedent moisture content. The dynamic nature of critical shear stress in an upland agricultural field and grassed waterway of a nested watershed was investigated at Pioneer Farm by measuring critical shear stress over a range of antecedent soil moisture conditions. Results showed that critical shear stress in both the grassed waterway and the agricultural field increased as soil moisture increased until the soil moisture content reached the plastic limit. Above the plastic limit, critical shear stress of the soil decreased significantly and was relatively constant, ultimately rendering the soil more susceptible to erosion. Finally, the process-based Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model was used to develop regressions equations that use channel, watershed and storm characteristics to estimate sediment delivery ratios (SDRs) for grassed waterways draining upland agricultural fields. Upland agricultural management scenarios considered included: (i) corn-oat-alfalfa crop rotation, chisel plow tillage, and terraces, and (ii) corn-oat-alfalfa crop rotation, chisel plow tillage, and no-terraces. Better R2 values resulted from equations developed for non-terraced fields compared to terraced fields suggested that channel and storm parameters were better able to explain the variation in SDR for grassed waterways draining from non-terraced fields.

Online Invasive Species Training Modules

The invasive species education modules will help you become more comfortable with identifying these species in the field. Each module includes a short ten question quiz at the end to help you assess your newly acquired knowledge. Completing a module should only take about 15 minutes.

Gadgets and Apps for the Field

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Alicia Ihnken from Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Parks and Recreation Division

Vegetation Maps Circa 1800

Between 1816 and 1856, Michigan was systematically surveyed by the General Land Office (GLO), which had been established by the federal government in 1785. The detailed notes taken by the land surveyors have proven to be a useful source of information on Michigan's landscape as it appeared prior to wide-spread European settlement.

Cluster Coordinator Position Description (Volunteer)

The Cluster Coordinator serves as the primary volunteer leader of a local Cluster. The role of a Cluster Coordinator multi-faceted: He or she is simultaneously a leader, champion, facilitator, and/or gardener as the community necessitates. This role is vitally important to ensuring the continued involvement of a diverse array of partners, the recruitment of new partners, and to maximize the success of a local Cluster and leverage the strengths of those involved. The Cluster Coordinator can draw on the support, systems, and structures provided by the Network to fill this role. Learn more about this role here!

Non-Native Phragmites Management in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Darcy Rutkowski of The Upper Peninsula Resources Conservation and Development Council

Michigan's Natural Communities

This natural community classification is designed to serve as a tool for those seeking to understand, describe, and document the diversity of natural communities in Michigan.

Beyond the Usual Suspects in Invasive Species Control: Detection and Control of Oak Wilt

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Heidi Marie Frei from Michigan Department of Natural Resources

A New Approach to Monitoring Conservation Easements from a Fixed Wing Aircraft

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Charles Dawley from Little Traverse Conservancy

Mast Production in an Increasingly Stochastic World

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Alexander K. Killion, Michigan State University

Benefits of Prescribed Burning on Private Land

This brochure is a basic introduction to prescribed burning and outlines only the simplest prescribed burns. Courtesy of Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

How Your Garden Interacts with Nature

Most of us garden because we like to grow our own healthy food and love to have nature around us. Yet our gardens can affect the natural areas surrounding our homes in some unexpected ways. Take this quiz below, and come up with your own answers. Then check out our answers at the end!

Guidelines for Hosting a Seed Collection Workday

This is a simple handout to guide land owners and managers through hosting a successful native seed collection workday.

Feral Swine in Michigan

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Tim Wilson from USDA Wildlife Services

Sorting through the seed bank: Ecology and applications to restoration

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference Presentation by Dr. Lars Brudvig of Michigan State University and Mitch Lettow of the Southwest Michigan Land Conservancy.

Prairie Moon Cultural Guide

This is an excellent - arguably the best - species-specific guide to seed germination, soil moisture requirements, sun exposure, and much more. If you propagate native plants by seed, this is will become one of your go-to references for propagating over 800 native forbs, grasses, sedges, rushes, trees, shrubs, vines, ferns, and cacti.

FQA 101: Using the Floristic Quality Assessment for restoration monitoring

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Adam R. Thada of Cardno, Inc.

MNAC Website Archives

The Michigan Natural Areas Council was dedicated to the preservation of natural areas of outstanding scenic beauty or scientific value that represent the full spectrum of Michigan's natural wealth. At The Stewardship Network we believe as MNAC did - that it is our duty and privilege to pass on to future generations the very best that we can of our natural heritage - this storehouse of interrelating plants and animals which has evolved through the ages in a fascinating and complex equilibrium.

Oak Savanna Restoration by Prescribed Fire and Overstory Thinning

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Lars Brudvig of Michigan State University.

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