Resources

Welcome to our Searchable Resources Directory! We've pulled together the best stewardship, conservation, and environmental resources for you to use and share.

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Dissolved and suspended sediment transport dynamics

This thesis investigates the sediment transport dynamics during baseflow and storm flow conditions in the main tributaries of the two drinking water reservoirs in McLean County, Illinois.

Ontario Ministry of Transportation: Restoring and enhancing tallgrass and oak savanna habitat on the 300 acres of greenspace associated with the Rt. Hon Herb Gray Parkway

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Barb Macdonnel of the Ontario Ministry of Transportation.

Lower Grand River Phragmites Control--A Public/Private Partnership Success Story

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Melanie Manion of Ottawa County Parks and Recreation Commission and Todd Bowen of GEI Consultants of MIchigan, and Brian Majka.

Developing and Improving a Prescribed Fire Program…and Culture, Part II

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Brad Woodson of McHenry County Conservation District.

Ecology & Society: Spanning Boundaries to Bring Transdisicplinary Science into Practice

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Lisa Brush of The Stewardship Network and Paige Fisher of the School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Michigan.

The Loss of Wildlands At the National and Minnesota Scales Since European Settlement

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Bruce D. Anderson.

You have volunteers do what???

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Tina Stephens of Ann Arbor City Natural Area Preservation.

Restoring Native Prairie Habitat in a Suburban Campus Landscape

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Deanna Geelhoed and Kara Smit of Calvin College.

Brent Run Creek Relocation

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Brian Majka of GEI Consultants of Michigan.

Where and when to restore? Developing a practical rapid assessment method to prioritize areas for ecological management

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Justin Heslinga of the Land Conservancy of West Michigan.

From Clipboard to Drone: Monitoring Wild "River" Rice by Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Part II

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Stephen W. Allen of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi.

Multi-Stage Channels: Water Quality Benefits Provided by the State-of-the-Science in Drain Design

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Rob Myllyoja.

A “good” restoration year relies on more than just rainfall: Inter-annual variation affects initial dynamics of sown prairies

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Anna Groves of Michigan State University.

Reptiles of Ohio

Reptiles have long fascinated people. In recent years, biologists have recognized that the class Reptilia should actually include all of the birds, if it is to include all descendents of a particular ancestral form. This is because crocodiles and alligators are more closely related to birds than to lizards. While this makes sense from a scientific standpoint, in common English usage, the term reptile is still reserved for the alligators and crocodiles (crocodilians), turtles, tortoises, lizards, snakes, and the tuatara, a lizard-like animal found only on several tiny islands off the coast of New Zealand. It is not a lizard, but rather the last representative of a group of reptiles that flourished about 200 million years ago.

Impact of dredging on phosphorus transport in agricultural ditches

ABSTRACT: Drainage ditches can be a key conduit of phosphorus (P) between agricultural soils of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and local surface waters, including the Chesapeake Bay. This study sought to quantify the effect of a common ditch management practice, sediment dredging, on fate of P in drainage ditches. Sediments from two drainage ditches that had been monitored for seven years and had similar characteristics (flow, P loadings, sediment properties) were sampled (0-5 cm) after one of the ditches had been dredged, which removed fine textured sediments (clay = 41%) with high organic matter content (85 g ⁄ kg) and exposed coarse textured sediments (clay = 15%) with low organic matter content (2.2 g ⁄ kg). Sediments were subjected to a three-phase experiment (equilibrium, uptake, and release) in recirculating 10-m-long, 0.2-m-wide, and 5-cm-deep flumes to evaluate their role as sources and sinks of P. Under conditions of low initial P concentrations in flume water, sediments from the dredged ditch released 13 times less P to the water than did sediments from the ditch that had not been dredged, equivalent to 24 mg dissolved P. However, the sediments from the dredged ditch removed 19% less P (76 mg) from the flume water when it was spiked with dissolved P to approximate long-term runoff concentrations. Irradiation of sediments to destroy microorganisms revealed that biological processes accounted for up to 30% of P uptake in the coarse textured sediments of the dredged ditch and 18% in the fine textured sediments of the undredged ditch. Results indicate that dredging of coastal plain drainage ditches can potentially impact the P buffering capacity of ditches draining agricultural soils with a high potential for P runoff. (KEY TERMS: nonpoint source pollution; nutrients; transport and fate; water conservation.)

Indigenous Environmental Studies & Scientists

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Dan Longboat of Trent University.

Safeguard Your Investment: A Case for Permanent Land Protection in Stewardship Plans and How a Local Partnership Can Help

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Meghan Prindle of Legacy Land Conservancy and Six Rivers Land Conservancy.

Garlic Mustard Video

A short video on Garlic Mustard

Spirit Food: Outcomes of the Decolonizing Diet Project

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Dr. Martin Reinhardt.

Climate Change in the United States: Highlights

Climate change, once considered an issue for a distant future, has moved firmly into the present. Corn producers in Iowa, oyster growers in Washington State, and maple syrup producers in Vermont are all observing climate-related changes that are outside of recent experience. So, too, are coastal planners in Florida, water managers in the arid Southwest, city dwellers from Phoenix to New York, and Native Peoples on tribal lands from Louisiana to Alaska. This National Climate Assessment concludes that the evidence of human-induced climate change continues to strengthen and that impacts are increasing across the country.

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