Resources

Welcome to our Searchable Resources Directory! We've pulled together the best stewardship, conservation, and environmental resources for you to use and share.

Looking for a specific resource that you can't find? Or do you have a resource you think we should include? Send an email to staff@stewardshipnetwork.org and let us know!

Brent Run Creek Relocation

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Brian Majka of GEI Consultants of Michigan.

Reducing Phosphorus Loadings and Harmful Algal Blooms

Reducing Phosphorus Loadings and Harmful Algal Blooms - A Report of the Lake Erie Ecosystem Priority

Ticks and Your Health

Ticks are significant vectors of pathogens that cause human disease. Tick-borne diseases do occur in Michigan, and can be serious or fatal if not properly diagnosed and treated. This resource is a great overview of common tick types, lyme disease, treatment options, prevention, and tick removal.

Quantification of seasonal sediment and phosphorus transport dynamics

Abstract - Purpose: Phosphorus (P) is a limiting nutrient for most US Midwestern aquatic systems and, therefore, increases of P, through point or non-point sources (NPS) of pollution such as agriculture, causes eutrophication. Identifying specific NPS contributions (e.g., upland vs. stream channels) for sediments and P is difficult due to the distributed nature of the pollution. Therefore, studies which link the spatial and temporal aspects of sediment and P transport in these systems can help better characterize the extent of NPS pollution. Materials and methods Our study used fingerprinting techniques to determine sources of sediments in an agricultural watershed (the North Fork of the Pheasant Branch watershed; 12.4 km2 area) in Wisconsin, USA, during the spring, summer, and fall seasons of 2009. The primary sources considered were uplands (cultivated fields), stream bank, and streambed. The model used fallout radionuclides, 137Cs, and 210Pbxs, along with total P to determine primary sediment sources. A shorter-lived fallout radioisotope, 7Be, was used to determine the sediment age and percent new sediments in streambed and suspended sediment samples (via the 7Be/210Pbxs ratio). Results and discussion Upland areas were the primary source of suspended sediments in the stream channels followed by stream banks. The sediment age and percent new sediment for the streambed and suspended sediments showed that the channel contained and transported newer (or more recently tagged with 7Be) sediments in the spring season (9–131 days sediment age), while relatively old sediments (165–318 days) were moving through the channel system during the fall season. Conclusions Upland areas are the major contributors to instream suspended sediments in this watershed. Sediment resuspension in stream channels could play an important role during the later part of the year. Best management practices should be targeted in the upland areas to reduce the export of sediments and sediment-bound P fromagricultural watersheds.

Ecology & Society: Spanning Boundaries to Bring Transdisicplinary Science into Practice

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Lisa Brush of The Stewardship Network and Paige Fisher of the School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Michigan.

Phosphorus dynamics within agricultural drainage ditches

Excessive phosphorus loading from fertilizers in agriculture results in enriched runoff and downstream aquatic system eutrophication. This study evaluated phosphorus dynamics in agricultural drainage ditches across eight sites within the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV). The objective of the study was to examine the capacity of drainage ditches across the LMAV to sorb P. Spatially and temporally, all drainage ditch sediments had very low immediately bioavailable phosphorus (Pw), and a very low degree of phosphorus saturation (DPS < 20%) throughout the LMAV. Phosphorus binding energy (K) (0.34–0.60 L/mg) and P sorption maxima (17.8–26.6 L/mg) were low, with very little variation in space and time. Using these metrics, drainage ditches sampled within the LMAV could be described as P sinks, capable of sorbing varying degrees of P seasonally as a result to changes in the Fe-P pool. Sorption, however, will likely be low due to low P sorption maxima and low binding energies. These results will help in P management within primary aquatic systems (such as drainage ditches) within the agricultural landscape and enhance P mitigation strategies at the source, prior to runoff reaching downstream aquatic systems.

Helping Farmers Protect Water Quality

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Amy Gilhouse, National Fish and Wildlife Federation

Butterflies and Moths of North America

The Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) project is ambitious effort to collect and provide access to quality-controlled data about butterflies and moths for the continent of North America from Panama to Canada.

Climate Resilient Communities: Review of climate impacts to tree species of the Huron River watershed

The Huron River and its watershed, is already experiencing the effects of climate change in the form of more intense and frequent storms, rising temperature and changing precipitation patterns. This report summarizes key patterns locally and explores the implications for trees of the Huron River watershed in a changing climate.

Evaluating Water Quality Best Management Practice Effectiveness to Inform Decision

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Emma Giese, Chesapeake Research Consortium

Small Inland Lake Bathymetric Mapping

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Alan Proctor of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians.

Restoring Native Prairie Habitat in a Suburban Campus Landscape

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Deanna Geelhoed and Kara Smit of Calvin College.

The Powerful Partnership – Plants and Pollinators

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Meghan Milbrath of Michigan State University

Reducing Community Vulnerability and Increasing Resilience Through Ecological Design

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Steve Witman, Resilience Planning and Design, LLC

Bridging the gap between innovation/technology and restoration in the fight against invasive Phragmites

2017 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Jason Carlson from Applied Ecological Services

From Clipboard to Drone: Monitoring Wild "River" Rice by Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Part II

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Stephen W. Allen of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi.

Climate Change Projections for Tree Species

Michigan’s forests will be affected by climate change during the 21st century. Several reports describe the climate change risks to forests in Michigan and the Midwest (Pryor et al. 2014, Handler et al. 2012). Foresters and researchers can use experience and information from past events to develop expectations about how future change might affect forests, but there are limits to what we can learn from the past. This handout shows projections for two climate scenarios to “bracket” a range of possible futures. Results for “low” and “high” climate scenarios can be compared side-by-side to get a sense for the range of possible outcomes.

Pages