Resources

Welcome to our Searchable Resources Directory! We've pulled together the best stewardship, conservation, and environmental resources for you to use and share.

Looking for a specific resource that you can't find? Or do you have a resource you think we should include? Send an email to staff@stewardshipnetwork.org and let us know!

Agricultural Practices That Conserve Grassland Birds

This guide will provide an overview of Michigan's grasslands and the diversity of habitat they provide to birds; describe agricultural practices that can be adopted to improve grassland bird habitat; share experiences from farmers that have used these methods and provide a list of programs that offer resources to those that want to learn more.

The Loss of Wildlands At the National and Minnesota Scales Since European Settlement

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Bruce D. Anderson.

Lower Grand River Phragmites Control--A Public/Private Partnership Success Story

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Melanie Manion of Ottawa County Parks and Recreation Commission and Todd Bowen of GEI Consultants of MIchigan, and Brian Majka.

Sample Volunteer Liability Release Form

An editable sample liability release form for volunteer workdays.

Comparing the effectiveness of native and commercial mycorrhizal fungi in establishing and colonizing plants in an urban prairie habitat in Chicago

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Sarah Richardson of DePaul University.

Indigenous Environmental Studies & Scientists

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Dan Longboat of Trent University.

Using SEAD to Support Collaboration

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Dharma Akmon, University of Michigan

How the Stewardship Network Creates Resilient Communities

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Lisa Brush and Spencer Kellum of The Stewardship Network

Engaging Visitors and Volunteers with Customized Mobile Guides

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by George Hammond, The Animal Diversity Web

Rebirth of the Pigeon River: A Conservation Story about Reconnecting Native Ecosystems Through Dam Removal and Invasive Species Management

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Lisha Ramsdell and Jennifer Muladore of Huron Pines.

Natural Advantages: The Power of Parks, Heritage and Outdoor Assets

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Brad Garman, Michigan Environmental Council and Ann Conklin, Michigan Recreation and Park Association

Reptiles of Ohio

Reptiles have long fascinated people. In recent years, biologists have recognized that the class Reptilia should actually include all of the birds, if it is to include all descendents of a particular ancestral form. This is because crocodiles and alligators are more closely related to birds than to lizards. While this makes sense from a scientific standpoint, in common English usage, the term reptile is still reserved for the alligators and crocodiles (crocodilians), turtles, tortoises, lizards, snakes, and the tuatara, a lizard-like animal found only on several tiny islands off the coast of New Zealand. It is not a lizard, but rather the last representative of a group of reptiles that flourished about 200 million years ago.

Garlic Mustard Video

A short video on Garlic Mustard

Where and when to restore? Developing a practical rapid assessment method to prioritize areas for ecological management

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Justin Heslinga of the Land Conservancy of West Michigan.

Utilizing a Terrestrial Invasive Species Rapid Response Team for Landscape Level Management in the Adirondack Park

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Zachary Simek.

Developing and Improving a Prescribed Fire Program…and Culture, Part I

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Brad Woodson of McHenry County Conservation District.

Impact of dredging on phosphorus transport in agricultural ditches

ABSTRACT: Drainage ditches can be a key conduit of phosphorus (P) between agricultural soils of the Atlantic Coastal Plain and local surface waters, including the Chesapeake Bay. This study sought to quantify the effect of a common ditch management practice, sediment dredging, on fate of P in drainage ditches. Sediments from two drainage ditches that had been monitored for seven years and had similar characteristics (flow, P loadings, sediment properties) were sampled (0-5 cm) after one of the ditches had been dredged, which removed fine textured sediments (clay = 41%) with high organic matter content (85 g ⁄ kg) and exposed coarse textured sediments (clay = 15%) with low organic matter content (2.2 g ⁄ kg). Sediments were subjected to a three-phase experiment (equilibrium, uptake, and release) in recirculating 10-m-long, 0.2-m-wide, and 5-cm-deep flumes to evaluate their role as sources and sinks of P. Under conditions of low initial P concentrations in flume water, sediments from the dredged ditch released 13 times less P to the water than did sediments from the ditch that had not been dredged, equivalent to 24 mg dissolved P. However, the sediments from the dredged ditch removed 19% less P (76 mg) from the flume water when it was spiked with dissolved P to approximate long-term runoff concentrations. Irradiation of sediments to destroy microorganisms revealed that biological processes accounted for up to 30% of P uptake in the coarse textured sediments of the dredged ditch and 18% in the fine textured sediments of the undredged ditch. Results indicate that dredging of coastal plain drainage ditches can potentially impact the P buffering capacity of ditches draining agricultural soils with a high potential for P runoff. (KEY TERMS: nonpoint source pollution; nutrients; transport and fate; water conservation.)

Developing and Improving a Prescribed Fire Program…and Culture, Part II

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Brad Woodson of McHenry County Conservation District.

Integrating Climate Change into Northeast and Midwest State Wildlife Action Plans

The purpose of this NE CSC-led cooperative report is to provide a synthesis of what is known and what is uncertain about climate change and its impacts across the NE CSC region, with a particular focus on the responses and vulnerabilities of Regional Species of Greatest Conservation Need (RSGCN) and the habitats they depend on. Another goal is to describe a range of climate change adaptation approaches, processes, tools, and potential partnerships that are available to State natural resource managers across the Northeast and Midwest regions of the United States. Through illustrative case studies submitted by the NE CSC and partners, we demonstrate climate change adaptation efforts being explored and implemented across local and large-landscape scales.

Ticks and Your Health

Ticks are significant vectors of pathogens that cause human disease. Tick-borne diseases do occur in Michigan, and can be serious or fatal if not properly diagnosed and treated. This resource is a great overview of common tick types, lyme disease, treatment options, prevention, and tick removal.

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