Resources

Welcome to our Searchable Resources Directory! We've pulled together the best stewardship, conservation, and environmental resources for you to use and share.

Looking for a specific resource that you can't find? Or do you have a resource you think we should include? Send an email to staff@stewardshipnetwork.org and let us know!

Increasing Effectiveness of Phragmites Eradication Efforts with Improved Application Technology

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Mark Ledebuhr, Application Insight Consulting, LLC; Phyllis Higman, Natural Features Inventory

Mistaken Identity?

Mistaken Identities? Invasive Plants and their Native Look-Alikes an Identification Guide for the Mid-Atlantic

Natural Advantages: The Power of Parks, Heritage and Outdoor Assets

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Brad Garman, Michigan Environmental Council and Ann Conklin, Michigan Recreation and Park Association

Volunteer Position Description - Sample

Use this sample volunteer position description to recruit volunteers and plan your stewardship project.

Phragmites.org

It's Phragmites, Phragmites australis, Phragmites communis, common reed, common reedgrass, giant reed, giant reedgrass, elephant grass, water reed, cane, yellow cane, Roseau, or roseau cane. It's pronounced frag-MY-teez. This website was started in August 2007 by the people of Harsens Island, Michigan who are ready to take control of the Phragmites which have invaded their island.

Oak Wilt Landscape Tips

Oak Wilt, caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum, is a devastating vascular wilt disease of oak trees. Although not proportionally epidemic as Dutch Elm Disease or Emerald Ash Borer, oak wilt is nevertheless locally destructive and costly to control. Oak wilt is a difficult disease to understand, diagnose and control. It is suggested that professional help be obtained if oak wilt is suspected.

Vegetation Maps Circa 1800

Between 1816 and 1856, Michigan was systematically surveyed by the General Land Office (GLO), which had been established by the federal government in 1785. The detailed notes taken by the land surveyors have proven to be a useful source of information on Michigan's landscape as it appeared prior to wide-spread European settlement.

Prairie Moon Cultural Guide

This is an excellent - arguably the best - species-specific guide to seed germination, soil moisture requirements, sun exposure, and much more. If you propagate native plants by seed, this is will become one of your go-to references for propagating over 800 native forbs, grasses, sedges, rushes, trees, shrubs, vines, ferns, and cacti.

Chains Saws, Brush Cutters and Breakdowns: A Maintenance How-to Workshop

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Michael Hahn, City of Ann Arbor Natural Area Preservation

Keynote: Past is not Prologue: How Climate Change alters the Science and Art of Managing Ecosystems

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference Keynote presentation by Rosina Bierbaum

Guiding Landowners in Stream Restoration

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Rob Myllyoja, Consultant

Nutrient mitigation capacity in Mississippi Delta, USA drainage ditches

Eutrophication and hypoxia within aquatic systems are a serious international concern. Various management practices have been proposed to help alleviate nutrient loads transported to the Gulf of Mexico and other high-profile aquatic systems. The current study examined the nutrient mitigation capacity of a vegetated (V) and non-vegetated (NV) agricultural drainage ditch of similar size and landform in the Mississippi Delta. While no statistically significant differences in ammonium, nitrate, or dissolved inorganic phosphorus mitigation between the two ditches existed, there were significant differences in total inorganic phosphorus percent load reductions (V: 36%  4; NV: 71%  4). However, both agricultural drainage ditches were able to mitigate nutrients, thus reducing the load reaching downstream aquatic receiving systems. Further studies examining ecosystem dynamics within drainage ditches such as sediment and plant nutrient partitioning, as well as microbial processes involved, are needed to provide a better understanding of natural nutrient variability, seasonality and flux.

Oak Savanna Restoration by Prescribed Fire and Overstory Thinning

2016 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Lars Brudvig of Michigan State University.

Status and Strategy for Flowering Rush Management

Invasive flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus L., hereafter FR) has invaded the shores of Michigan waterways since the early 1900’s (Core 1941; Stuckey 1968; Anderson et al. 1974). This document was developed by Central Michigan University and reviewed by Michigan Departments of Environmental Quality and Natural Resources for the purposes of: Summarizing the current level of understanding on the biology and ecology of FR; Summarizing current management options for FR in Michigan; Identifying possible future directions of FR management in Michigan. This document used the current information available in journals, publications, presentations, and experiences of leading researchers and managers to meet its goals. Any chemical, company, or organization that is mentioned was included for its involvement in published, presented, or publically shared information, not to imply endorsement of the chemical, company, or organization.

Full Circle Learning and Living: Promoting Resilience in Ecosystem Relations 2

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Heather Naigus, The Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission

Using SEAD to Support Collaboration

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Dharma Akmon, University of Michigan

Building Resilience Into Restored Prairies

2015 Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference presentation by Tyler Basset, Michigan State University

Federally Endangered, Threatened, Proposed and Candidate Species in the Upper Midwest (Region 3)

A list of all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Federally Endangered, Threatened, Proposed and Candidate Species in the Upper Midwest (Region 3).

Pages