Paradise Lake Pilot Boat Washing Station: Preventing Spread Alien Invasive Species

Paradise Lake Pilot Boat Washing Station: Preventing the Spread of Alien Invasive Species in the Lake Michigan Watershed and Engaging a Community (BEG)
Kira Davis, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians

The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians (LTBB) partnered with the State of Michigan Department of Natural Resources and the Paradise Lake Improvement Board to minimize the spread of invasive species by constructing the first boat wash station in Emmet County. The boat wash station aids in minimizing the transfer of Eurasian milfoil and zebra mussels to other lakes and minimizes new invasive species being transferred into Paradise Lake. Surveys were completed to assess whether water users support boat washes, what types of best practices water users are implementing and what prevents water users from using best practices. Based on survey results, education/outreach items were created by a community workgroup. Items include invasive species boat cards, shoreline management and recreation users' best practices rack cards and a three paneled kiosk. The project enabled collaboration on other projects such as a rain garden and site renovations. The presenter will walk through the project, feature education items and discuss project transferability.

Kira Davis, Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians
Kira Davis has worked with Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians (LTBB) for 14 years. She began working at LTBB soon after graduating with a BS in environmental issues and applications from Michigan State University. She is a Tribal Citizen of the Grand Traverse Bay Bands of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians but grew up within the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians reservation area. Kira feels blessed to give back to the Tribal and local community. She is currently the water quality specialist for LTBB. Kira stays up to date on new monitoring technologies and incorporates new methods into the assessments of wetlands and surface waters within and adjacent to the LTBB reservation. She provides education and outreach to the Tribal and non-tribal community, representing the Tribe on various workgroups, protecting Tribal waters. She is passionate about protecting nibiish (water) and recognizes it as a cultural responsibility.