Habitat Restoration Techniques and Management Opportunities for American Woodcock (BEG)

Timberdoodles (aka American Woodcock) in Michigan: Habitat Restoration Techniques and Management Opportunities for American Woodcock (BEG)
Eric Ellis, Ruffed Grouse Society/American Woodcock Society

American woodcock (Scolopax minor) are a charismatic species of early successional forest habitat and are popular with hunters and birders alike. Throughout their range woodcock populations have been declining roughly 2% annually since 1968. This presentation will give an overview of woodcock ecology and population trends and provide descriptions and examples of easily replicated habitat management techniques that are being used in the Midwest to reverse the population decline. Recent results from telemetry research looking at year round woodcock habitat use will be presented along with information on sources of funding for improving woodcock habitat.

Eric Ellis, Ruffed Grouse Society/American Woodcock Society
Eric is a native Michigander who received his BS in resource ecology and management from The University of Michigan. He later lived in Mongolia volunteering with the Peace Corps as a parks/wildlife specialist and later guiding fly-fishing and horse riding trips. He worked for the city of Ann Arbor's Natural Area Preservation division and has an MS degree from the University of Idaho's College of Natural Resources. Recently he worked for the Conservation Resource Alliance assisting private landowners and other partners in protecting and restoring fish and wildlife habitat in northern Michigan. Eric is now the regional wildlife biologist and grant writer for the Ruffed Grouse Society/American Woodcock Society where he assists members, partners and the public with implementing projects to benefit young forest species and educating people on the benefits of this important habitat type.